Back again

Feb. 11th, 2014 05:04 pm
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I'm back here on Dreamwidth, too, I guess. I only seem to know two people here (Hi, TB, Hi, Frotz!) but maybe I can figure out how to find others I know here. I have to update SO many of my Web-based things. But I set them all up the first time, so I oughta be able to play with them successfully once again. Like, I should probably figure out what I want to do about cross-posting.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Haven't figured anything out yet.
This user interface looks an awful lot like LJ's.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
In the wake of the stormy hysteria it has become apparent that at the very least I need a phone that does text messaging more handily than the current LG, a phone so plain and old-fashioned that even the workmates who barely notice me are aware that I have an hilarious antique phone.
I asked these questions last year, but I still haven't gotten around to getting the phone, so I'm mainly checking to see if things have changed.

I want an iPhone, for a variety of reasons, some of them irrational Apple fandom. Has this become any more stupid than it was last year?

I want one that can access the Internet on its own, i.e., 3G or 4G, so I can do credit card transactions at events that don't have WiFi. I might also want to be able to use it to provide internet to another device occasionally.

I might like to watch an hour or so of TV on it a day. This seems to be the most expensive thing, running 6 to 8 GB per month on the data plan. Is this nuts?

I want to be able to send emails and texts and run a couple of apps, like one that helps me track calories and exercise.

Is there any compelling reason to get the iPhone 5 instead of a 4?
Is a 16 GB phone enough or am I going to want 32 or 64?

Thanks!
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I know I don't get out much, but when did a Michaels craft and tchotchke shoppe open in Porter Square? Is it in the ex-Pizzeria Uno? Is it in the ex-Pier One?
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I ordered these cards in August -- the note from the sender is dated August 18. They arrived yesterday. Everything I get that's made in the 18th-century style ends up arriving as if it had traveled in the 18th-century style, too. So these were probably delayed for lacking the proper tax stamp, or by the circuitous routes of smuggling. But they are gorgeous.


http://tarot-de-marseille-heritage.com/english/boutique.html

Here is an entertaining review of this deck.
http://mycuriouscabinet.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/tarot-de-marseilles-pierre-madenie-dijon-1709/

I found them online when looking for an 18th-century tarot deck that would not be plastic and round-cornered. Discovered there's a bit of interest in reproducing the historic decks more historically, and fell for these.

When they got here, the envelope was wet and most of the writing had blurred enough that I was surprised they could make out the address. There was what appears to be a tire track on the back of the envelope. There was also water inside the package, but the cards and their box and the vital replica inner wrapper were all okay.

I had actually given up on getting them at all. The last time I ordered something from a French website, it never arrived, nor did the vendor acknowledge my request for a refund. 
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
PSA: Wish I had known this when I was 10. When picking cockleburrs out of the fur of a fluffy dog, turns out if you can cut the burr open, the little pieces are way easier to remove than the whole unitary sphere. Slice it with the blade of a scissor and it practically disintegrates, and can be removed with a fairly normal slicker brush. And the seeds inside are actually slippery; the trick with them is not being squicked (they look like bugs) and then keeping them from escaping all over the house.

Of course it's totally possible that this is a different kind of burr than I was picking out of collies in Syracuse 45 years ago.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
'Tis better to watch a single episode of 30 Rock on Netflix than to curse the domestic ban on sitcoms.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Or at least its near-apotheosis.
(starts at about 02:29)
King Abdullah II of Jordan, on the Daily Show, speaking on the anti-Islamic video, "Innocence of Muslims".

"I am a direct descendent of the Prophet, so obviously I'm terribly insulted by the video and I refuse to watch it, because obviously the whole point of the video was to create this reaction that unfortunately happened. But at the same time, I'm completely against that type of reaction. I mean, you do not take innocent lives into your own hands."
http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-september-25-2012/king-abdullah-ii-of-jordan-pt--2

I tried to get the video to embed but failed.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Happy New Year, everybody.

o shit

Aug. 26th, 2012 12:03 pm
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Hmm. Bova's vanilla pizzelles taste like bacon. It's possible they are made with lard.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Angela Cartwright as an adult! She looks great!
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Dear Mrs. Obama:
I am getting really annoyed that your husband's campaign thinks my support is less than whole-hearted this time around because my vanity is injured.
 
Don't get me wrong: I do want my candidates to listen to me and to represent my views.
 
But I don't care a damn about getting to go the convention or sitting "up front" with you; I don't care a damn about meeting you or your husband in person; I don't care a damn about going to a celebrity dinner as the token voter. I wish your husband's campaign would stop offering me these things; they make it impossible for me to donate, because I don't want to give you and your husband's campaign strategists the idea that this kind of political starfucking is what matters to me.
 
I want to be "important" to your husband's campaign and administration by helping to give them the political capital to set and pursue and support decent, constructive, progressive, human, honest policy.
 
And as long as your husband's administration's commitment to such policy is only half-hearted, my support for his campaign will also be half-hearted. I have donated when the appeal didn't insult me, when it was connected with my support for health insurance reform. But your husband did a special video message to supporters back in late 2009 or early 2010 in which he outright lied about his intent to pursue comprehensive reform and a single-payer system. That broke the charm of this whole personal-outreach approach.
 
I work in marketing, and the cold fact about using "high touch" social media to build relationships with "consumers"--in your case, voters--is that when you lie, when the product doesn't live up to its promises, that lie, that betrayal also feels personal. Probably the biggest thing I am doing for your husband's campaign right now is trying desperately to encourage my friends to vote at all in November. For them, the high-touch disappointment has been so personal that they think refusing to vote for your husband will register as retaliation. You and I know the gesture will be lost in the sea of the U.S.' generally poor voter turnout and the votes lost to Republican efforts to restrict voter eligibility.
 
If there is anyone in the campaign office who even reads this note, please, please, tell David Axelrod that it doesn't work when you lie.
 
Close Guantanamo, and stop other human-rights abuses.  Make the case against budget austerity and deficit reduction when unemployment is so high and economic growth is stalled. Prosecute the banks and Wall Street executives who manufactured this economic collapse, and promote tough regulation that will prevent it from happening again. Spend money on schools. Stop the destruction of the social safety net. Commit the U.S. to international accords that reduce human-caused climate change. Give me a better argument to use on my friends than "Romney will be worse."
 

And for fuck's sake stop sending me invitations. I don't want to hang out with you. I want your husband and his administration to take better care of this country, so I'll feel better about entrusting it to them for another four years.
 
Thank you for your time and attention.
 
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I have an open but unused box of (the wrong) Epson color printer cartridges.
T0441 20 black
T0445 20 color multipack
Fits Epson Stylus C64, C66, C84, C86, CX4600, CX6400 (which is the one I think I used to have), CX6600.
Apparently a $71 value. I just want to not be responsible for throwing it out. If you can use them, they're yours.
Here's Epson's list of printers these work with:
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I don't specially wanna go to irk today.

Mars

Aug. 6th, 2012 02:07 am
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
OK. Really have to go to sleep now. Want to stay up waiting for pictures of micromartians.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
I have it stuck in my brain that in the movie Starman (or in some movie like that, but I swear I can hear Jeff Bridges delivering the line in his Starman voice), the space visitor learns about death, and, parroting something someone has said earlier about a machine, remarks, "It was a bad design" or some variant: "It is a bad design," "it was a very bad design," something like that. However, I can't find it or verify it. I've seen Starman and looked for it; I've done Google searches. I thought for five minutes that maybe it got cut from the movie after the original release because it might offend the religious, but it seems like that would at least have left a ruckus-trail somewhere.

Now, my problem with a lot of sf is the Boston Science Fiction Film Marathon, which causes one to drift in and out of wakefulness whilst multiple movies are playing. So, yeah, I could have just dreamed it or pastiched it, possibly, as [livejournal.com profile] scliff suggests, from Buckaroo Banzai, where Carl Lumbley's black lectroid disparages the ship with those words.

But I really feel like I saw it used for an alien apprehending human mortality. I think it when I am confronted by human mortality. So where did I get it?
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Apparently a massacre on opening night will knock about $30 million off your first-weekend take.
Batman Sales High Despite Shootings
By Brooks Barnes, NYTimes

“Putting an emphasis on grosses at this time just doesn’t feel appropriate,” said Phil Contrino, editor of Boxoffice.com.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
The Globe found a Massachusetts connection with Aurora.

Massachusetts couple recalls scene at Aurora theater during shooting

By Zachary T. Sampson, Globe Correspondent
lioritgiyoret: (1964)
Tom Davis was Al Franken's comedy and writing partner in the 1970s.
My brother once bragged that Davis was among the famous and important people to whom he sold cocaine. So there is, you know, a bit of a family ... connection.

People sometimes accuse me of dredging up these stories to make my family seem more ... something. But that's the family I had, and these are the stories they gave me. It's either tell stories like these or pretend I have no origin.
lioritgiyoret: (Default)
Sometimes, something is just such a damn fine piece of writing and analysis that I'm awestruck and inspired. This here is a stunning little interview with Aaron Sorkin, by Sarah Nicole Prickett of the Globe and Mail. It has caused me to think seriously new thoughts about how to function as a writer in the world of the present, and also has illuminated some of why The Newsroom, despite pandering to every cliche that originally brought me into journalism, is now too depressing to watch even as a fantasy. When a fantasy that panders to my cliches is too depressing, it's because the fantasy does not really consider its own implications. But Prickett's made that clear in a refreshing and tasty way.

"Really, all that’s happening is that feminism has achieved some of its purposes and pluralism has taken root. Systems are tenuous; forces of change are multiplying; the great-(white)-man theory will not hold."

In other news, why do my eyes seem so blurry in the morning before coffee? And also, new air conditioners: They work better than 10-year-plus old ones.
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